Sunday, 1 July 2007

marching bands, city centre

I was shopping in the city centre today and watched this Orange band parade down Royal Avenue. I'm not sure, but I think the big drum featured on the third photograph down is a traditional Lambeg Drum. It certainly appears to have the bloodstains often associated with Lambeg drumming.










17 comments:

Lavenderlady said...

And why do the big drums have bloodstains?

Kate said...

Good question, lavenderlady! You made it into the Theme Day, too!

Abraham Lincoln said...

I never heard of blood on the drums before but it sure looks like blood stains to me.

Nice shots of the band.

Abraham Lincoln
—Me as Moses—

Cybez said...

The lambeg drum is larger than the one in the photo, you can see one @ http://www.grandorange.org.uk/images/lambeg_1.jpg
I'd reckon the bloodstains could be bloodstains of the drummer who's been attacked by someone who doesn't like the noise of the drum.There's a class in my village where they teach children to play the lambeg drum and thankfully I can't hear them from my house.

blueboat said...

First of all, an apology Cybez is right, - having spent a few minutes looking at lambeg drums on websites, I can see that the one in my photo is a true lambeg (just isn't big enough).
The blood is certainly real however. At these parades, drums are often played over a period of several hours and the drummer's knuckles or wrists can start to bleed (eugh!) through the repeated action of drumming with the cane. I used to go to watch the 12th July parade when I was a child and have vivid memories of the band drummers - all sweat and blood!

Here's a short quote from an article on lambeg drums:
"no drummer is thought to be worth his salt until two livid semi-circles of his blood stain the skins at each side of the instrument, drawn from the laceration of his knuckles on the wooden rims as he beats out his message of defiance."

You can view the complete article here: http:/www.dlol10.utvinternet.com/lambeg.htm

Ann said...

I think I like cybez' explanation of why the bloodstains are there blueboat :-D

I remember wanting to attack my neighbour who was learning to play the sax. I still get agitated whenever I hear the saxophone now!LOL.

Dr. A. said...
This comment has been removed by the author.
Dr. A. said...

hi blue' you obviously have not been in the vicinity of a Lambeg drum being played because when it's played you KNOW it's being played because it's LOUD! AND YOU CAN'T HEAR YOURSELF THINK! - you've also given yourself away as a left footer and that fluter has your number so you better watch out, he'll be clodding h'akers at your blog (c:

Dr. A. said...

... oh and I nearly forgot. Generally it takes 2 men to carry a Lambeg drum, though you will see more stalwart drummers carrying it themselves.

blueboat said...

ok, ok! it wasn't a lambeg!! (it has been SUCH a long time since I voluntarily attended a parade...) (And, while we're on the subject no, I'm not actually a left footer, born and bred east belfast prod....just not a very good one obviously!)

Dr. A. said...

we're two of a kind blue' - lapsed prods (c:

blueboat said...

ps. Dr A, I hope you notice that I've finally updated my clock - I don't like all this hard work to go unappreciated!

blueboat said...

Have you read that book? Any good?
Was considering buying 'lapsed protestant' and 'i was a teenage catholic' to take along on holiday, but remembered in the nick of time that I go on holiday to forget where I come from...

Dr. A. said...

Congrats on fixing the clock. See you're not so lazy after all (c:
Didn't know there was a book by that name - I tend to avoid books dealing with Norn Iron and the troubles. Prefer something more escapist. Favs at the moment are Ian Rankin's 'Rebus' novels and Andrea Camilleri's 'Inspector Montalbano' novels. Would also recommend books by Susan Vreeland - especially 'The Girl In Hyacinth Blue'.

Dr. A. said...

.... or are you taking the mick (c:

blueboat said...

it (lapsed protestant) is by Glen Patterson - apparently quite good. I know what you mean about 'troubles' stuff - usually excruciating or downright offensive (or in the case of A night in November, both). Have read most of the Rebus novels but haven't tried the Andrea Camilleri series - I must look these up.

Cybez said...

Instead of that clock would you not put up a Red Hand of Ulster for the month of July. Some background music on the blog would add to the experience too, maybe a flute band playing the Sash. I could try and be as bigoted as possible when I comment... blah blah blah ;-)